I am dating someone with bipolar disorder Partnersuche donauwörth

In my experience recovering from a manic episode takes time.

It’s been four months since the peak started to wane and I’m just now able to see and feel more clearly and easily without the devastating mania monster driving my thoughts, feelings, and behaviors. I am surprised at how long it takes for clear-headed thinking to return. I’m able to be in the present and enjoy people and things around me without that awful pressured feeling.

Being in a committed relationship with someone who has bipolar disorder is a tremendous challenge. The statistics vary according to the source, but most experts quote rates two or three times higher than the national average. Spouses with bipolar disorder are likely to have a different impression of their marriage than their husband or wife.

A huge proportion of the emails and messages I receive are from people who need information and support for relationship issues that arise out of one (or both) partner’s bipolar disorder. A common – but staggering – statistic that gets bandied about is that 90% of marriages involving at least one bipolar spouse will end in divorce. During episodes of mania, someone with bipolar disorder is likely to do things that are particularly destructive. For example, a married person with bipolar disorder is often not aware of the full impact their disorder has on their partner, children, or other family members.

I returned and we went to counseling and he saw his own doctor.

They put him on Lithium and I started to think we may make it after all.

We have major credit card debt, a big beautiful home (that costs a fortune to run), nice cars, lavish vacations, etc.

He thinks if he works hard he should have whatever his heart desires at whatever minute he desires it.

Everything is my fault, I do not make enough money (I do make a nice salary), he wants a new luxury car, he is God and everyone else is an idiot, etc.

He has built a very good company from scratch and has managed to maintain his business success.

The thing is though the more we make the more we spend.

The non-bipolar partner, and the marriage itself, takes on a “bipolar life of its own” as the non-bipolar spouse see-saws between solicitous and extreme care-giving during their bipolar husband’s or wife’s depressive episodes, and feelings of blame, resentment, anger and betrayal when their spouse is in the manic phase of bipolar disorder. They may get on with life and be happier and healthier, either as single people or as part of a new couple. They may regret the break-up of the marriage and wish they had sought counseling and other solutions. As Goodwin & Jamison point out in the most authoritative textbook on bipolar disorder, , many studies show that living alone or being single often leads people to stop taking their medication and complying with their treatment plansin general. In fact, research has shown that there is little or no difference between the state of the marriages where one spouse has bipolar disorder but is in remission, and other married couples in general.

Thus the relationship can be very turbulent and uncertain. Divorce is often a prelude to “downward drift” where the person with bipolar disorder seeks and receives less treatment, suffers more frequent and more serious mood swings, encounters problems with employment, the legal system, and life in general, and experiences deteriorating finances and physical health. Further, both groups had similar perceptions of significant events during the course of their marriages.

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